Your “Teacher Tired” May Not Be In Your Head

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This school year began as most school years do – planning weeks in advance, creating an atmosphere of welcome for my new cohorts, anticipating seeing co-workers again after a long, relaxing summer. I was excited to be starting my fourth year at my district and couldn’t wait to see the new faces in my classes.

There was one, seemingly insignificant, difference. I was dog tired before classes had even started.

In past years, I was always a bundle of energy during Meet The Teacher night and was well-known in my district for being the “over-achiever” who would spend her weekends at the school prepping. This year, I was struggling to find the motivation to type up my usual materials in cute fonts (if you know me at all, cute fonts are everything).

I blamed the energy lag on a few stress factors outside of my control, promised to buckle down even harder on my nutrition and exercise routine (I already ran and lifted weights with a balanced diet), and to start meditating. I figured that it was all in my head and would go away after I got into the swing of things. I told myself that Year 4 must just be “catching up to me”.

It didn’t. My energy lag turned into chronic fatigue. Add to that an increasing brain fog that turned my processing speed to Jell-O, and I was miserable. I started forgetting things, feeling exhausted, and had to make even more lists (than I normally did) just to stay on top of my duties. Life was NOT fun. Teaching was unbearable.

Mid-October, I started noticing that I was down a lot (also VERY out of character). My diet hadn’t changed at all, nor my exercise routine, yet I was starting to gain weight. Only a few pounds, but it was creating a sense of helplessness in me that I had never really experienced before. What was wrong with me? Why couldn’t I snap out of this funk?

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Then, Thanksgiving came around and I couldn’t deny that the weights I had normally been lifting easily were a struggle, I was irritable all the time (my poor family), and the glands in my neck were swollen as if I had contracted the world’s worst cold. Yet, I didn’t have any other cold symptoms. I couldn’t handle even the smallest bit of stress without losing it, my eyebrows and eyelashes were thinning out, and I was getting skull-splintering headaches that exploded if I laid my head on my pillow at night.

I begrudgingly scheduled a doctor’s appointment, which was pushed out well past Christmas due to busy schedules, I figured that I’d probably get over it well before then.

I did not take things so lightly when I woke up in the middle of the night during Christmas Break and could not breathe properly. It felt like someone was gently squeezing my throat closed, I couldn’t breathe out of my nose and my eyes were puffy as if I had pigged out on Red Lobster’s signature bread for days. The next day, I was elevated to the top of the appointments list and got in to see my doctor. My lab work found that my thyroid had, essentially, stopped working.

The thyroid functions when the TSH hormone in your body is sent out to inform the thyroid that the body needs more T4 hormone. If you have high levels of TSH in your labwork, that means your thyroid is underperforming and could lead to full-blown hypothyroidism. If your T4 levels are high, then your thyroid is overperforming and could mean you are experiencing symptoms of hyperthyroidism – both of which will mess with your body.

The thyroid regulates the body’s metabolic rate as well as heart and digestive function, muscle control, brain development, mood and bone maintenance. Without it functioning at optimal levels, you may experience:

  • Chronic fatigue
  • Muscle weakness
  • Weight gain
  • Brain fog
  • Vision blurriness
  • Water retention
  • Swollen glands
  • General sadness or depression
  • Thinning hair
  • Skin dryness
  • High blood pressure
  • Loss of taste and smell
  • Cold intolerance
  • High cholesterol
  • Constipation
  • Irregular periods
  • Trouble staying asleep

If you are noticing these symptoms combined, you need to schedule lab work to check your thyroid levels. It is relatively easy to diagnose and thyroid levels can be balanced back out with a synthetic thyroid medication, as well as other natural remedies if the severity of the thyroid issue is low. There are many reasons that the thyroid could begin to dysfunction, such as Hashimoto’s, a virus from childhood, or even some research linking to prolonged birth control usage. 40% of Americans have some form of thyroid dysfunction! That’s nearly HALF of our country! It is more common than I ever knew.

In my case, I had severe hypothyroidism. TSH levels should be around 0.4 to 4.0. My labs read that my TSH levels were above 200. YIKES. I had waited way too long to get checked out and my body was doing everything in its power to get me to listen. Since my case was so severe, I was immediately placed on a synthetic thyroid medication that gives my body the T4 hormone it needs to function correctly.

My doctor said that I would notice the most changes within 6-8 weeks of being on the medication, as it needed time to build up in the body’s system and take effect. Within two weeks, I noticed:

  • General happiness
  • Increased patience
  • Reduced swelling of the neck glands
  • Reduced puffiness of the face
  • Reduced loss of eyebrows and eyelashes
  • Slight weight loss
  • Less brain fog
  • Being able to smell EVERYTHING
  • Increased energy levels
  • Sleeping through the night

Ultimately, do not make the same mistakes that I did. Your symptoms may not just be “teacher tired” or all in your head. We are trained as educators to push through rather than address these issues, to don our superhero cloaks and power through these insignificant discomforts. However, sometimes the struggle IS real. Your job as a teacher is of the utmost importance. You are nurturing the minds of our future geniuses, raising children in the confines of your classroom to become productive and thoughtful adults. It is of the utmost, absolute importance that we take care of you, first, so that you can take care of your kiddos.

As much as writing sub plans is devilish work (my personal opinion), I urge you all to get lab work at your yearly check-up. If anything, you will be able to rest easy knowing that your thyroid is working beautifully. Instead, you can plan a much needed vacation for that “teacher tired”!

 

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